Meet The Researcher

Associate Professor Yasmine Probst

Associate Professor Yasmine Probst

University of Wollongong

About
Let’s get started! Tell us an interesting fact about yourself...
I can make a three leafed clover shape with my tongue (inherited by only one of my three children) and I’m a choc-a-holic (yes dietitians do eat chocolate)!
What inspired you to get involved in MS research?
In addition to my dietitian hat I also wear the hat of a person with MS. Since my diagnosis, I have become increasingly aware of the mixed messages related to food, nutrients and MS. I feel that my unique set of experiences will allow me to help others who may not understand or may be hesitant about various foods. Food can help to improve our health and we need to ensure that this is recognised.
What do you think has been the most exciting development in MS research?
Exciting developments in MS research are the growing recognition of modifiable lifestyle factors in relation to disease progression. I am also inspired by the genetic advances that have been discovered over the years making substantial progress for MS research.
Tell us about your current research project...
This project will help to work out how many vitamins and minerals are eaten by people with multiple sclerosis in a number of countries. It will do this by comparing the existing tool that has been used in the HOLISM study with another tool to see how similar the outputs are. The project will also try to change the existing tool output so that the study can report on a wider range of food information.
Why is your research important and how will it influence the understanding and treatment of MS?
There is an increasing need for credible information about healthy eating for persons with multiple sclerosis. Many people make substantial changes to the food they eat following diagnosis with multiple sclerosis though are unable to maintain these in the long term. Further, existing links between multiple sclerosis and various foods and nutrients need to be strengthened through more high quality scientific studies. This research project will contribute to the scientific evidence by allowing large cohort studies of persons with multiple sclerosis to articulate intake information that currently cannot be quantified. By quantifying this information we will add to the evidence for modifiable lifestyle factors aiding in future development of evidence-based guidelines to support the management of multiple sclerosis.
What do you enjoy most about working in the lab and what are some of the challenges you face?
In my research role as a dietitian I enjoy helping people to understand food and the many benefits it can have for their health. I also love to eat, grow and prepare food which adds to this enjoyment as I can show others how easy it is. Most importantly I also love a challenge and working in the area of dietetics that I do creates many of these on a regular basis.
Read More

Newsletter subscription

  • Enter your details

Associate Professor Yasmine Probst